Reflection Professional Learning

Quality Maths lessons involve 3 aspects:
• Explicit Learning
• Guided and Independent Investigation
Reflection

Reflection allows children to identify and explain their current understanding of mathematical concepts. To reflect, children think about, discuss and record their response to, a specific reflection question. Recorded responses to reflection questions allow teachers - and the child - to see growth in each child’s understanding

EXPLICIT LEARNING VIDEO provides video explanation of the Reflection lesson segment.
PROFESSIONAL LEARNING RESOURCE
 provides down-loadable written explanation of the Reflection lesson segment.

LEADING A PROFESSIONAL LEARNING SESSION provides a script and agenda for a teacher to use to lead participants (including parents!) through the Reflection lesson segment. 

Reflection allows children to identify and explain their current understanding of mathematical concepts.

To reflect, children think about a specific reflection question. A reflection question is an open-ended broad question, allowing all children to access regardless of their current level of understanding. A child’s response to the question will provide formative assessment data about their current understanding, including any misunderstandings (misconceptions).

To reflect, children share their understandings when reflecting with other children. The children are within one another’s zones of proximal development. Vygotsky defines a zone of proximal development(i) as closely related levels of understanding. Reflecting within their zone of proximal development, and with others within their zone of primal development, serves to develop both children’s understanding and meta-language as the depth of their explanation will be greater than when explaining to an adult who’s zone of development is considered by the child to be much higher.

To reflect, children record their current their current understanding of mathematical concepts. Recording requires and develops logical thought and language. Vygotsky’s research on Thought and Language(ii) demonstrates that to learn, we need to think, then talk, then record. All three are vital to learning. After children have thought about, then discussed their current understanding, giving them to opportunity to record allows them to reconcile and synthesise their previous understanding with new understanding developed in the lesson.
Recorded responses to reflection questions allow teachers to see growth in each child’s understanding over lessons, weeks and terms.

LEARN BY GRADELEARN BY CONCEPTTEACH BY GRADETEACH BY CONCEPTMATHEMATICSPEDAGOGY